TP-Link AC1900 Smart WiFi Router – High Speed MU- MIMO Router, Dual Band, Gigabit, VPN Server, Beamforming, Smart Connect, Works with Alexa (Archer A9), Black

February 22, 2020 - Comment

*Maximum wireless transmission rates are the physical rates derived from IEEE standard 802. 11 Specifications. Range and coverage specifications along with the number of connected devices were defined according to test results under normal usage conditions. Actual wireless transmission rate, wireless coverage, and number of connected devices are not , and will vary as a

Buy Now! $79.99Amazon.com Price
(as of April 19, 2020 9:01 am GMT+0000 - Details)

*Maximum wireless transmission rates are the physical rates derived from IEEE standard 802. 11 Specifications. Range and coverage specifications along with the number of connected devices were defined according to test results under normal usage conditions. Actual wireless transmission rate, wireless coverage, and number of connected devices are not , and will vary as a result of 1) environmental factors, including building materials, physical objects and obstacles, 2) network conditions, including local interference, volume and density of traffic, product location, network complexity, and network overhead and 3) client limitations, including rated performance, location, connection quality, and client condition.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Good, Warning at the End After 2 weeks of playing with the settings I finally got better performance than with my ISP supplied wireless router. I have fiber coming into my house, and have the 300 Mbps service from AT&T. My personal Win10 laptop performance is now at the same level as it was with the AT&T wireless router. However my IOS devices are doing much better with the TPLINK router. Additionally, my HP printer hasn’t had network disconnects (which required rebooting) since I installed the TPLINK. Perhaps that’s due to a stronger wifi signal.However, for the budget conscience people out there, I don’t think this is worth the expense if you have a decent ISP wifi router. If you notice performance issues, like I did with my IOS devices, and you need to do something about it, this is worth a shot.**** WARNING *****Their ‘tether’ app sends data back to the manufacturer on stuff, not sure what. It doesn’t say that during the app setup. I found it after a few days when…

Anonymous says:

NO FRILLS – GREAT SIGNAL – LOW COST TP-Link AC1900 My Netgear router from 2013 was starting to fail so I figured it was time to get a replacement so that I could avoid downtime. I paid about $170 for the Netgear back then, and, after looking at various choices I really wasn’t swayed enough to spend the same amount (or more) on its replacement. So I read a bunch of reviews and critiques on non-Negear routers and thought I would take a chance on this model, the TP-Link AC1900 @ $79.95. It arrived the next day and I found it easy to set up (about 10 min). Frankly, I was blown away at the D/L speeds I was getting from this inexpensive device! With our old router, we were able to get 40-50Mps on the opposite side of our house, using several devices and I thought that was pretty good. But with this new router, the D/L speeds shot up to between 180-225 Mps on the 5Ghz band – exceptional. Unless this router craps out in some short period of time, I can recommend this to be the best $80 you could spend for a no-frill basic wireless router.

Anonymous says:

Does all that I need I have typically changed ISPs every year or two when they jack up the introductory rates. Each time it is necessary to change passwords on every wireless device and set up a new router with port forwarding, DDNS, etc. The last straw was when I was recently denied access to my ISP’s router settings because of their “maintenance”. So I decided to get my own router to end that nuisance and meddling. I don’t need more speed than required for 2-3 HD video streams, so at less than $100, the TP-Link AC1900 Archer A9 seemed attractive.So in a week the router has been configured without problems for about 5 wired (with an ethernet switch) and 5 wireless devices, including two slingboxes and an industrial temperature monitoring computer requiring static routing and port forwarding with DDNS service. (TP-Link provides its own free dynamic DNS service or for use of NO-IP or DynDNS.) There is a downloadable 112 page user manual with live indexing that seems easy to use, although…

Write a comment

*